Recent Posts

We are the Cleaning Experts

11/23/2020 (Permalink)

SERVPRO is Here to Help during this time of need

During this unprecedented time caused by the global pandemic of coronavirus, this is a reminder to our customers that we are specialists in cleaning services, and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards.

Specialized Training

We are prepared to clean and disinfect your home or business, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work that regular janitorial staff perform on a daily basis.

The CDC encourages cleaning of high-touch surfaces such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, light switches, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and tables. Other spaces mentioned in the CDC’s guidance for commercial spaces include:

  • Kitchen/Food Areas
  • Bathrooms
  • Schools/Classrooms
  • Offices
  • Retail Spaces
  • Water Fountains
  • Shelving/Racks
  • Sales Counters
  • Carpets and Rugs
  • Stair Handrails
  • Elevator Cars
  • Playground Equipment
  • Fitness Equipment

Specialized Products

The CDC recommends usage of a labeled hospital-grade disinfectant with claims against similar pathogens to the coronavirus. Multiple products in the SERVPRO product line carry the EPA-approved emerging pathogens claims. While there is currently no product tested against this particular strain of the coronavirus, we are following all guidelines as provided by the CDC and local authorities.

Call Today for a Proactive Cleaning

If your home or business needs deep cleaning services, call the experts today –SERVPRO Of Wayne County at 919-751-5353

Is your office energy efficient?

9/18/2020 (Permalink)

  1. Purchase energy-efficient office equipment. Before you buy or lease office electronics, check to see if they are ENERGYSTAR-rated. An ENERGYSTAR-rated appliance has been evaluated and deemed energy-efficient, which can save you money and help you manage your small business energy costs, especially in the long run.

  2. Reduce Peak Demand. One of the best ways to save electricity in an office is to reduce your peak demand. The phrase “peak demand” refers to the hours in a day when energy usage is at its highest. Peak demand times are typically normal office hours (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.). You can reduce your demand during this time by staggering work hours / start times, running heavy equipment and factory equipment during the evening and early morning hours, and conserving energy throughout the day. 

  3. Program your thermostats. This is one of those office energy saving tips that is especially relevant for a 9-5 workplace. You don’t need to heat or cool a workplace after everyone has gone home for the night. Even if your team’s hours vary, using programmable or smart thermostats to manage the temperature during “off” hours can make a big difference.

  4. Turn off lights when not in use. It might seem like a no-brainer, but in a typical office, lights stay on in areas like break rooms, bathrooms, or conference rooms, even when those spaces aren’t being used. Sensor lights can help to keep the lights on when needed, but off when they’re not.

  5. Use energy-efficient light bulbs. It's one of the easiest and simplest energy saving ideas in the workplace: switch out your regular incandescent bulbs with energy-efficient bulbs such as CFL or LED. This will help you use a significantly less amount of electricity.

  6. Take advantage of natural sunlight. If you’re fortunate enough to have an office space where there’s abundant natural light, use it! On a sunny day, you might not need to turn on the lights at all in areas where windows can give all the illumination you need. While using passive solar heating might not seem like one of the ways to save energy at work, it really does help. The fewer kilowatt hours of energy you use, the less you have to pay.

  7. Start running fans. You can reduce your energy usage in the workplace simply and easily by running fans in offices, warehouses, showrooms and kitchens. Fans keep air flowing so your HVAC unit can run more efficiently.

  8. Power down computers and other office equipment at the end of the day. If computers are not being used through the hours when your staff aren’t working, have your team be in the habit of shutting them down before they leave. Turning off and unplugging as many devices as possible at the end of the day is a simple way to cut back. This includes energy efficient coffee makers, toasters, and similar appliances.

  9. Prevent “Phantom energy”. Phantom energy is the energy that is still being used by equipment that remains plugged in but not in use. A great office energy-saving tip is to have your computer peripherals (printers, monitors, etc.) connected to power strips (aka “surge protectors”) so that the flip of a single switch can shut down several devices at a time.

  10. Think outside your building. Are you in control of the landscaping around your business? If so, you have a great opportunity to create energy-savings for your small business with energy efficient landscaping. Strategically planting trees to block winds or provide shade on hot summer days can help reduce your heating and cooling costs. 

What is water damage restoration?

9/18/2020 (Permalink)

Water Damage Restoration

Water damage refers to the destructive processes that result when water intrudes into a building and its components. Examples of water damage include rotting wood, oxidation of metal (rust), microbial growth, and de-lamination of composite building materials. Once water seeps into building materials such as wood, dry wall, or masonry, a natural chemical reaction starts to occur, breaking down the integrity of the material. If left unaddressed, water damage can cause the stability of a structure to be compromised, making it unsafe for human occupancy. In addition, grey water, or water that contains significant chemical, biological, or physical elements, may quickly become hazardous to human exposure as microbes and other contaminants begin to grow to dangerous levels when water has been standing in excess of 48-72 hours. Many highly contagious illnesses are connected to water damage including skin infections, hepatitis A, salmonella, eye infections, respiratory infections, and Weil’s disease, as well as liver, blood, and kidney issues.

Water Damage Restoration Solutions

The first step in water damage restoration is emergency mitigation. This includes locating the source of and eliminating the influx of intruding water, as well as an assessment of the damage and danger to humans. These services should only be performed by trained, licensed flood restoration professionals. Once the damage and health concerns have been assessed, drying and dehumidification services should be performed on all affected areas. A quick assessment of equipment, documents, and other items can determine whether or not contents restoration is possible or necessary. In addition, mold remediation services can minimize the long-term health effects of microbial growth associated with water damage. Once your structure is deemed safe for human occupation, temporary power and HVAC services can get your business back online and back to work, minimizing business interruption.

Hurricane Preparedness

9/14/2020 (Permalink)

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over the water and move toward land. Threats from hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surge, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, and tornadoes. These large storms are called typhoons in the North Pacific Ocean and cyclones in other parts of the world.

Basic Preparedness Tips

  • Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the local hurricane evacuation route(s) to take and have a plan for where you can stay. Contact your local emergency management agency for more information.

  • Put together a go-bag: disaster supply kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, first aid supplies, medications, and copies of your critical information if you need to evacuate

  • If you are not in an area that is advised to evacuate and you decide to stay in your home, plan for adequate supplies in case you lose power and water for several days and you are not able to leave due to flooding or blocked roads.

  • Make a family emergency communication plan.

  • Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications. To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name and the word “alerts.”

After a Hurricane

  • Listen to local officials for updates and instructions.

  • Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.

  • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.

  • Watch out for debris and downed power lines.

  • Avoid walking or driving through flood waters. Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of fast-moving water can sweep your vehicle away.

  • Avoid flood water as it may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines and may hide dangerous debris or places where the ground is washed away.

  • Photograph the damage to your property in order to assist in filing an insurance claim.

  • Do what you can to prevent further damage to your property, (e.g., putting a tarp on a damaged roof), as insurance may not cover additional damage that occurs after the storm.

Thunderstorms 101

9/11/2020 (Permalink)

What is a thunderstorm? A thunderstorm is a rain shower during which you hear thunder. Since thunder comes from lightning, all thunderstorms have lightning.

Why do I sometimes hear meteorologists use the word “convection” when talking about thunderstorms? Usually created by surface heating, convection is upward atmospheric motion that transports whatever is in the air along with it—especially any moisture available in the air. A thunderstorm is the result of convection.

What is a severe thunderstorm? A thunderstorm is classified as “severe” when it contains one or more of the following: hail one inch or greater, winds gusting in excess of 50 knots (57.5 mph), or a tornado.

How many thunderstorms are there? Worldwide, there are an estimated 16 million thunderstorms each year, and at any given moment, there are roughly 2,000 thunderstorms in progress. There are about 100,000 thunderstorms each year in the U.S. alone. About 10% of these reach severe levels.

When are thunderstorms most likely? Thunderstorms are most likely in the spring and summer months and during the afternoon and evening hours, but they can occur year-round and at all hours. 

Thunderstorms frequently occur in the late afternoon and at night in the Plains states. What kinds of damage can thunderstorms cause? Many hazardous weather events are associated with thunderstorms. Under the right conditions, rainfall from thunderstorms causes flash flooding, killing more people each year than hurricanes, tornadoes or lightning. Lightning is responsible for many fires around the world each year, and causes fatalities. Hail up to the size of softballs damages cars and windows, and kills livestock caught out in the open. Strong (up to more than 120 mph) straight-line winds associated with thunderstorms knock down trees, power lines and mobile homes. Tornadoes (with winds up to about 300 mph) can destroy all but the best-built man-made structures.

Where are severe thunderstorms most common? The greatest severe weather threat in the U.S. extends from Texas to southern Minnesota. But, no place in the United States is completely safe from the threat of severe weather.

5 Tips to Prevent Water Damage

9/11/2020 (Permalink)

Most Homeowners insurance policies cover basic water damage claims up to the purchased limit.

But you know what’s a lot easier than going through the claims process? Preventing the water damage in the first place!

Check out these 5 suggestions for preventing water damage:

1. Be careful where you plant

Some plants and trees, like weeping willows, have pretty invasive roots. If you’re not careful, they’ll grow right into your sprinkler system, drainage field, pipes, and septic tanks. Plan before you plant to keep roots away from any water lines.

2. Clean out roof gutters

You know it’s on your to-do list anyway, so if you can, take a safe climb up to your roof next Sunday and check out your gutters. If you’re seeing lots of leaves, birds’ nests, sticks, and whatnot up there, your gutters may not be doing the job you hired them for. And on a rainy day, a clogged gutter can send water spilling into your home’s foundation, through the roof, or down to your basement. That could cause some serious water damage! So next time you’re doing some seasonal cleaning, make sure those gutters are clean. And if your gutters are too high, be safe and get a professional to check them.

3.  Keep an eye on your water bill

With so many water pipes hidden behind walls and in the floors in your house, you might not know there’s a leak until the damage is done. That’s why it’s a good idea to keep a close eye on your monthly water bill. If you see it starting to creep up, or get one that’s uncommonly high, it’s a pretty good sign that you may have a leak somewhere.

4. Use a drain snake instead of unclogging chemicals

No matter how crazy clean you are, from your shower to your kitchen sink, clogs are going to happen. And chances are at some point in your life you’ve used one of those powerful chemical drain cleaners to get things moving again. But as convenient as they may be, most folks don’t realize those caustic chemicals are also eating away at their pipes (and they might not be too good for you either). If you rely on them a lot, you could be setting yourself up for leaks. That’s why owning a drain snake is a good solution to clear away clogs. They’re pretty inexpensive, you can get them at your local hardware store, and they can cut through most any clog you’ll have without damaging pipes or making your eyes red and teary.

5. Never pour grease down your sink

You’ve probably heard this before, but you should definitely avoid pouring grease down your kitchen sink. It doesn’t matter if you flush it with hot or cold water. It can still congeal and cling to your pipes, and could still cause some serious damage and blockage.

Some people use detergent to break up grease before pouring it down the drain…and that may help sometimes. But there’s no guarantee that it’ll keep the grease from sticking to your pipes, so why take the risk?

The safest thing to do is just to pour your grease in an empty can, and either let it sit or put it in the refrigerator. Once it hardens you can toss it in the trash and get rid of it. Done and done.

What is in your storm kit?

9/10/2020 (Permalink)

Here is what federal authorities recommend for a basic kit that last three days, but you should tailor yours to your family's needs, especially if you have small children.

  • One gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation;
  • Non-perishable food and a manual can opener;
  • A battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA weather radio with tone alert and extra batteries;
  • Flashlight and extra batteries;>
  • First aid kit;
  • Whistle to signal for help;
  • Filter mask or cotton t-shirt, to help filter the air;
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation;
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities;
  • Plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place;
  • Important family documents in a waterproof container;
  • Items for unique family needs, such as daily prescription medications, infant formula or diapers.

Water damage in your business is our business!

9/7/2020 (Permalink)

When business owners visualize water damage, they often picture a massive storm wiping out power lines, flooding offices, and shutting down businesses for days at a time. It is true that commercial water damage is often the result of floods and water that stems from weather events and storms. 

 
However, many entrepreneurs and business space renters forget that storms and severe weather aren't the only causes of floods and water damage. Here are some of the typical causes of water damage to commercial buildings. 
 
1. Outdated Sprinkler Systems 
Some older office and retail buildings still have outdated sprinkler systems that work in conjunction with fire protection systems. While such sprinklers can come in handy during a fire emergency, they can also cause commercial flood damage if they are faulty or in need of replacement. This could easily damage inventory and business assets.

2. Damaged Appliances and Equipment 
This cause of commercial flood damage is more common in restaurants and catering facilities, as well as any business that has appliances and equipment that make use of water. If the appliance fails and sends water across your building, especially during late hours when no one is around, you may come back to work and face a water emergency. 
 
3. Busted Pipes and Plumbing 
Just like in a residence, if the plumbing system in your workplace fails water damage could be the result. 

4. Backed Up Sewer Lines 
This is another cause of commercial water damage that often catches business owners by surprise. Should the sewer line to your building back up or become damaged, realize the potential dangers of contaminated Black Water which can cause health effects and ruin products and office furnishings. 
 
If your business has suffered commercial water damage, SERVPRO of Wayne County will get you back up and running again. Call us anytime 24/7 at (919)751-5353

When Disaster Strikes!

9/2/2020 (Permalink)

Don’t let disasters derail your business!

Whether it is a fire, flood, busted pipes, or faulty wiring, water and fire damage has the potential to take an outsized bite out of your business. Don’t let a little bad luck drag your business down.

With fire or water mishaps, you don’t just need cleanup. You need someone to correctly assess the damage, think through the details, and help you get quick help from your insurance carrier to cover the costs. That’s where our expertise makes the difference.

More than just a clean-up service, SERVPRO of Wayne County is your restoration partner.
Our expert technicians can deploy to your business 24/7, helping you assess the damage accurately, and provide photographic documentation that can be sent to your insurance agency. We have standing relationships with most of the insurance providers in the North Carolina and surrounding areas and understand what kinds of paperwork are required to submit your insurance claim.

Wildfires and what you need to know

9/2/2020 (Permalink)

  1. A wildfire is an uncontrolled fire. Wildfires often occur in wild, unpopulated areas, but they can occur anywhere and harm homes, agriculture, humans, and animals in their path.
  2. Firefighters also refer to these disasters as surface fires, dependent crown fires, spot fires, and ground fires. Want to make local firefighters happy -- and even better at their jobs? Bake cookies to say thanks! 
  3. 90% of all wildfires are started by humans.
  4. One of the largest fires in recent history was in 1825 when a fire tore through Maine and New Brunswick, Canada, burning 3 million acres of forest.
  5. Weather conditions can directly contribute to the occurrence of wildfires through lightning strikes or indirectly by an extended dry spell or drought.
  6. Wildfires can be caused by an accumulation of dead matter (leaves, twigs, and trees) that can create enough heat in some instances to spontaneously combust and ignite the surrounding area.
  7. Lightning strikes the earth over 100,000 times a day. 10 to 20% of these lightning strikes can cause fire.
  8. Manmade combustions from arson, human carelessness, or lack of fire safety cause wildfire disasters every year.
  9. An average of 1.2 million acres of US woodland burn every year.
  10. A large wildfire or conflagration is capable of modifying the local weather conditions (AKA producing its own weather).